Cat Grooming

 

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Grooming Tips

Grooming is a way to bond with your cat. The earlier you start the better.

We always touch their paws so they get used to us so they are not afraid when we trim their nails.

  • slowly accustom the cat to the process of grooming.

  • start with short grooming sessions of maybe 5 to 10 minutes. - some cats may get overstimulated and may bite you what we call love bite - try not to get mad- Just dont groom for as long next time -

  • Always brush in the direction that the hair naturally lays, never against the ‘grain.’ And be extra gentle around the belly and chest.

  • Start with a fine-toothed metal comb. Run it through the cat’s fur from head to tail tip. Watch for small pepper-like specks that could indicate the presence of cat fleas.

  • Use a bristle or soft rubber brush next to remove loose hair.

  • We also recommend the furminator once a week for thick hair coats.

  • If you can gets lots of mats and needs dental cleaning you can combine a dental cleaning with a shaving while they are under and they will more than likely feel much better.

  • Brushing twice a week should be plenty for most shorthaired cats, while a longhaired cat may need brushing every day.

 

Skin Problems

The condition of your cat’s skin is an indication of her overall health. When a skin problem occurs, your cat may respond with excessive scratching, chewing and/or licking. A wide range of causes—from external parasites and allergies to seasonal changes and stress, or a combination of these—may be affecting your cat’s skin and should be investigated. Skin problems are one of the most common reasons pet parents seek veterinary care.
 

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Trimming Nails

If you have never trimmed a cats or kittens nails. Please have your vet or vet tech show you. Some vet techs will even come to your house for a small fee to do it for you.They are also great cat sitters    
 

  1. Choose a chair in a quiet room where you can comfortably sit your cat on your lap. Get her when she’s relaxed and even sleepy, such as in her groggy, after-meal state. Take care that she isn’t able to spy any birds, wild animals or action outside nearby windows—and make sure no other pets are around.

  2. Gently take one of your cat’s paws between your fingers and massage for no longer than three seconds. If your cat pulls her paw away, don’t squeeze or pinch, just follow her gesture, keeping in gentle contact. When she’s still again, give her pad a little press so that the nail extends out, then release her paw and immediately give her a treat. Do this every other day on a different toe until you’ve gotten to know all ten.

  3. Your cat should be at ease with the sound of the clippers before you attempt to trim her nails. Sit her on your lap, put a piece of uncooked spaghetti into the clippers and hold them near your cat. (If she sniffs the clippers, set a treat on top of them for her to eat.) Next, while massaging one of your cat’s toes, gently press her toe pad. When the nail extends, clip the spaghetti with the clippers while still holding your cat’s paw gently. Now release her toe and quickly give her a treat.

  4. The pink part of a cat’s nail, called the quick, is where the nerves and blood vessels are. Do NOT cut this sensitive area. Snip only the white part of the claw. It’s better to be cautious and cut less of the nail rather than risk cutting this area. If you do accidentally cut the quick, any bleeding can be stopped with a styptic powder or stick. It’s a good idea to keep it nearby while you trim.

  5. With your cat in your lap facing away from you, take one of her toes in your hand, massage and press the pad until the nail extends. Now trim only the sharp tip of one nail, release your cat’s toe and quickly give her a treat. If your cat didn’t notice, clip another nail, but don’t trim more than two claws in one sitting until your cat is comfortable. Then, reward her with a special treat.

  6. A nail-trimming every ten days to two weeks is recommended. If your cat refuses to let you clip her claws, ask your vet or a groomer for help.

  7. If your cat resists, don’t raise your voice or punish her. Never attempt a clipping when your cat is agitated or you’re upset. And don’t rush—you may cut into the quick.

  8. Don’t try to trim all of your cat’s claws at one time.

  9. Do NOT declaw your cat. This surgery involves amputating the end of a cat’s toes and is highly discouraged by the ASPCA. Instead, trim regularly, provide your cat with appropriate scratching posts and ask your veterinarian about soft plastic covers for your cat’s claws.